Thursday, March 5, 2015

Bakerloo: Baker Street.

This is the 9th station travelling North on the Bakerloo Line. Baker Street has another four lines stopping here - Jubilee, Circle, Metropolitan and Hammersmith and City. With 10, it has the most platforms of any London tube station.









219 Baker street known as Abbey House is now a residential block owned by Ability Parkview. Originally built in the 1920s, it was the headquarters of the Abbey Road building Society headquarters from 1932 to 2002. The art deco frontage has been kept by the new owners.


The site owned by Ability Parkview also includes 221B, the fictional home of Sherlock Holmes. However the address only came into existence when Baker Street was extended in the 1930s long after Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote the books.


       




Just across the road is Regent's Park







Madame Tussauds is a wax museum on Marylebone Road displaying wax figures from the world of music,sport, film to the Royal family and famous historical figures. It was started by the wax sculptor Marie Tussaud and is now one of the most popular tourist attractions in London.The domed building next door used to be the Planetarium but is now part of the wax museum. The only Planetarium in London is a new state of the art one at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich.
The very busy road junction outside Baker Street tube station.












This is St James's Church with a view of the Manchester Mews in the foreground. Mews are converted stables and in this area they are numerous. The church is always referred to as St James's, Spanish Place although it is not in Spanish Place.
The unusual association with Spain dates back to the reign of Elizabeth I when the bishops of Ely let their Palace and chapel to the Spanish Ambassador and representatives of the Court of Spain. Until the reign of Charles I the chapel was used by English Catholics and became a sanctuary for them. Hence the Spanish connection.
















Octavia Hill (1838-1912) who was the co-founder of the National Trust started her work here in Gabutt Place.


Around the corner in Grotto Passage is one of the Ragged Schools built in 1846. A ragged school was for the poorest of children in London and were built in the slum areas. Founded by entrepreneurs of the 19th Cent, approximately 300,000 children attended these schools duing the mid 1800s.




Paddington Street Gardens were formed during the 18th cent as an additional burial ground for the Marylebone Parish Church. There are probably around 80,000 graves in this small garden and so is still consecrated ground. A list of names taken from the tombstones  can be found in the Westminster City Archives. In 1885 the gardens became a recreation ground and the tombstones were removed
but this mausoleum was left due to its excellent design.


Next door to  Baker Street Station  is the Lost Property Office for London Transport. This is where you will find your lost item if it has been found on a tube, bus or black cab. In 2013, 246,241 items were handed in, including 12,000 umbrellas, 11,000 sets of keys and 35,000 articles of clothing. If unclaimed after 3 months they are sold at auction.







                                           Statue outside Baker Street station.

Sharing with Our World Tuesday

23 comments:

  1. Being a graduate of a Ragged School would probably not look so great on a CV. No doubt they meant well.

    ReplyDelete
  2. My goodness, all to see at one stop! Thanks for visiting my blog!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wonderful variety of reflections. Have a good weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Some of my favourite London places here!

    ReplyDelete
  5. My best memories for this area...Fantastic photos...wonderful place...

    ReplyDelete
  6. Beautiful place with interesting structures.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I remember this part of London very well ! Arriving at Baker str. subway station seemed a little like entering into Holmes stories "for real" ! :o)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Oh, I wish I could be there right now. Nice shots!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Great photos and so many interesting places that I have only read about. I would love to be able to walk through Regent's Park!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Awesome series, I would like to check out this area. The Sherlock Holmes museum may be fun, and the park looks pretty. Love the heron! The church is gorgeous. Thanks for sharing, have a happy week!

    ReplyDelete
  11. I would love to visit there!! Such a terrific series and terrific captures!! Thanks, as always, for sharing!! I do so enjoy your posts/pics!!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Your posts always surprise me. I thought I knew London quite well, but now I'm not so sure. Really didn't know that the Planetarium (of my childhood) is not one anymore. Quite sad.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Nice, interesting photos and info!

    ReplyDelete
  14. wonderful photo tour and post ~ thoroughly enjoyed myself with your great photography!

    Happy Week to you,
    artmusedog and carol

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thanks for the lovely cybertour of this city. I hope someday I get to see these sights in person.

    Worth a Thousand Words

    ReplyDelete
  16. Lots of interesting spots to explore at this stop. That was a nice tour.

    ReplyDelete
  17. our Westerns Springs looks just yr you Regent Park, One of my favourite places in Auckland.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Really you brought us there by this post..thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I was there for a while! You have done well with the presentation.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Lovely shots of the Baker Street area.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I visited Sherlock Holmes museum ! So funny as he was only an invention !

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for taking the time to read and comment on my blog.